Camp David Agreement Between Israel And Palestine

On July 5, 2000, U.S. President Bill Clinton announced his invitation to Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Yasser Arafat to come to Camp David, Maryland, to continue their negotiations on the Middle East peace process. There was a promising precedent in the Camp David Accords of 1978, where President Jimmy Carter was able to negotiate a peace agreement between Egypt, represented by President Anwar Sadat, and Israel, represented by Prime Minister Menachem Bégin. The 1993 Oslo Agreement between Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who was later assassinated, and Palestine Liberation Organization Chairman Yasser Arafat had planned to reach agreement on all outstanding issues between the Palestinians and the Israeli parties within five years of the implementation of Palestinian autonomy. the so-called final status regime. However, the interim process under Oslo had not met Israeli or Palestinian expectations. The Camp David Agreement, signed in September 1978 by President Jimmy Carter, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, established a framework for a historic peace treaty concluded in March 1979 between Israel and Egypt. President Carter and the U.S. government have played a leading role in creating the possibility of this deal happening. Since the beginning of his term, Carter and his Foreign Minister Cyrus Vance have negotiated intensively with Arab and Israeli leaders in the hope of reconvening the Geneva Conference, which was created in December 1973 to end the Arab-Israeli dispute. The second agreement, entitled “A Framework for the Conclusion of a Peace Treaty between Egypt and Israel”, effectively resonated with the peace treaty (the Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty), ratified by both parties six months later, in March 1979, at the White House.

The move arose from a zeal to seek help from NATO countries to improve Egypt`s struggling economy, a belief that Egypt should start focusing more on its own interests than on the interests of the Arab world, and the hope that an agreement with Israel would catalyze similar agreements between Israel and its other Arab neighbors and help resolve the Palestinian problem. Prime Minister Bégin`s reaction to Sadaat`s initiative, although what Sadat or Carter did not expect, showed the willingness to engage the Egyptian leader. Like Sadat, Bégin saw many reasons why bilateral talks would be in his country`s best interest. . .